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Moorcroft_Brazil Rainforest

Variability in Plant Hydraulic Traits Explain Differences in Drought Tolerance Among Amazon Rainforests

May 29, 2017
A study led by Thomas Powell (Moorcroft Lab), former OEB PhD student, James Wheeler (Holbrook Lab) and Paul Moorcroft examined the unknown effects of drought tolerance among mature Amazon rainforest trees. The study found the differences in xylem and leaf hydraulic traits not only explained the differences in drought tolerance among mature Amazon rainforest trees, but is critical in determining the fate of Read more about Variability in Plant Hydraulic Traits Explain Differences in Drought Tolerance Among Amazon Rainforests
Charles Davis by Stu Rosner

Colossal Blossom: Charles Davis Studies Rafflesia's Peculiar Genetics

February 22, 2017

Charles Davis first encountered the Rafflesia arnoldii flower in a small village in northern Borneo while studying the region's plant diversity. Many years later, Davis, Director of the Harvard University Herbaria and Curator of Vascular Plants, continues his research on the mysterious, beautiful bloom that attracts flies with its surprising scent of rotting meat. Davis's research is featured in the current issue of Harvard Magazine

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A Painfully Interesting Subject

A Painfully Interesting Subject

October 17, 2016

Don Pfister and Jean Beagle Ristaino's latest article in BioScience"What a Painfully Interesting Subject": Charles Darwin's Studies of Potato Late Blight, looks closely at the pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.  The pathogen, responsible for the 1845 Ireland famine, is still wreaking havoc on potatoes and tomatoes in the United States and many areas of the world and is considered a threat to global

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David L. Des Marais

David Des Marais Awarded DOE's Joint Genome Institute Grant

September 15, 2016

David Des Marais (OEB Research Associate and Senior Fellow of the Arnold Arboretum) has been awarded a grant from the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute to investigate the genetic basis of annual and perennial strategies in plants. David will lead a team of scientists from University of Wisconsin, the University of Vermont, Michigan State University, and the University of Zaragosa (Spain). The team will work with several species in the grass genus Brachpodium growing in the Arnold Arboretum's Weld Hill Research building. 

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